Javier Molina

Returning to La Paz
Imágenes paceñas

14.1. - 11.4.

'Returning to La Paz' is an hommage to Javier Molina's birth place.  After living in the USA for a number of years the Bolivian photographer returned to La Paz in the early 1970s. Living abroad gave him a perspective that allowed him to see the city with new eyes.

All photos in the exhibition were taken between 1072 - 75.  Until now they have never been shown in one exhibition.  Limited edition fine art prints of all photos are available from Albumen Gallery.

For print enquiries contact the gallery at info(at)albumen-gallery.com.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Enter The Exhibition
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View of Alto de Ánimas, the hills surrounding the city from El Alto

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Tembladerani where all the rubish of the city was burned

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San Jorge from distrito Catahuma with the cathedral dome and Ceja del Alto

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View of Rio Abajo

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La Muela del Diablo (Devil's tooth)

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View of the zone of Tembladerani from calle Calama

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La Paz from calle Calama with the city centre below

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Plaza de Armas Murillo with the Palacio Legislativo to the left and the government place.

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He exposes a piece of paper which then is dropped in the developer and fixed almost instantly, thus obtaining a negative on paper, which is photographed to obtain a final positive. All in a matter of minutes.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Street photographer. His box not only is the camera, but below it is the developing darkroom.

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Calle Ingavi and calle Ismael Montes

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Avenida Illimani, esquina Fray José Velasco, Miraflores

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A doorway in Calle Catacora

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Yanacocha with the church at the top of the Way of the Cross (Calvario)

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A patio in the Santa Barbara neighbourhood

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Calle Catacora

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The city below from calle Pisagua

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Campanas (pueblo andino)

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Colonial patio, the National Museum of Art in Plaza Murillo

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Zapatero: a shoe mender

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Large communal patio. Villa Pabon

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A family under stress

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Each tambo offered specific produce: the one in this image specialized in oranges. Located in Miraflores where all the fruit arrived from the Yungas.

Aparapitas ready to carry purchases.

 

 
 
 

Un Tambo - a place where produce would arrive from the countryside around the city

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Fray José Velasco, Miraflores

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Calle Murillo esquina Cañada Strongest

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The smallest patio: in San Pedro neighbourhood

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Pasaje Genaro Sanjinez

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It is said that these type of cobblers were very patriotic and conservative

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Calle Jaén

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Much has been written about this character typical of the city. His principal role is to carry objects of any size from the markets to anywhere. He is of Aymara origin.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Aparapita - market porter

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Calle Sucre

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The steps of the cathedral with the Palacio Legislativo in the background

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The house where Isabel Allende lived for a while after the fall of Salvador Allende, president of Chile until September 11 1973.

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Lustrabotas (shoeshine) at rest

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Calle Aroma

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Una Chiflera. These women provide all sorts of medicinal plants for healing and witchcraft.

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Un soldador. (welder) He will weld anything and mend copper cooking pots.

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Lustrabotas (shoeshine)

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Afilador. Peripatetic utensil sharpener

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Un Velero. His only purpose is to sale candles.

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Much has been written about this character typical of the city. His principal role is to carry objects of any size from the markets to anywhere. He is of Aymara origin.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Aparapita - market porter

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At the gate of a cemetary

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Cementerio Andino

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To locals, the high mountain peaks are more than just breathtaking natural phenomena. Known as achachilas in Aymara and apus in Quechua, they’re  considered living beings, inhabited by powerful spirits. As controllers of weather and the source of vital irrigation water, these mountain gods must be appeased with constant offerings and worship, since if angered they’re liable to send hailstorms, frost or drought to destroy crops.

To locals, the high mountain peaks are more than just breathtaking natural phenomena. Known as achachilas in Aymara and apus in Quechua, they’re  considered living beings, inhabited by powerful spirits. As controllers of weather and the source of vital irrigation water, these mountain gods must be appeased with constant offerings and worship, since if angered they’re liable to send hailstorms, frost or drought to destroy crops. 

 

Illimani. This majestic mountain can be seen from anywhere in the city and is the symbol of permanence designated as the Achachila Mayor.

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Chapel at the end of the Way of the Cross (Calvario)

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